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Debridement

Explore the links below to discover debridement strategies and best practices:

Videos on debridement strategies
The importance of debridement in healing DFUs
Use of sharp debridement is selective, efficient, and fast
Sharp debridement is effective and efficient in preparing the wound bed

Videos on debridement strategies

Dr. Arti Masturzo and Dr. Shaun Carpenter demonstrate their techniques for debridement of a Grade 2 diabetic foot ulcer (DFU).

Dr Masturzo VideoDr Carpenter Video

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The importance of debridement in healing DFUs

The goal of wound bed preparation is to remove the barriers to healing and initiate the repair process in DFUs. Debridement is a critical component of wound care and wound bed preparation. The aim is to eliminate necrotic and/or fibrous tissue, decrease bacterial burden and exudates, increase the amount of granulation tissue, and reduce the numbers of abnormal or senescent cells within or surrounding the wound.1

Types of Debridement

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Use of sharp debridement is selective, efficient, and fast

There are many different sharp surgical tools available for debridement of DFUs. The benefits of sharp debridement are that it quickly removes nonviable tissue and allows for the immediate assessment of underlying wound bed condition.

Some commonly used sharp debridement tools include the following:

Debridement Tools

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Sharp debridement is effective and efficient in preparing the wound bed

The following are examples of various DFUs before and after debridement:

Before and After

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References
  1. Banta MR, Falabella AF. Wound bed preparation and debridement. In: Falabella AF, Kirsener R, eds. Wound Healing. London, England: Taylor & Francis; 2005.
  2. Martin P. Wound healing—aiming for perfect skin regeneration. Science. 1997;276(5309):75-81.
  3. Schultz GS, Sibbald RG, Falanga V, et al. Wound bed preparation: a systemic approach to wound management. Wound Repair Regen. 2003;11(suppl 1):S1-S28.
  4. Fletcher J. Wound bed preparation and the TIME principles. Nurs Stand. 2005; 20(12):57-65.
  5. Enoch S, Harding K. Wound bed preparation: the science behind the removal of barriers to healing. Wounds. 2003;15(7):1-29.
  6. Armstrong DG, Lavery LA, Nixon BP, Boulton AJM. It's not what you put on, but what you take off: techniques for debriding and off-loading the diabetic foot wound. Clin Infect Dis. 2004;39(suppl 2):S92-S99.
  7. Mulder GM, Armstrong DG, Seaman S. Standard, appropriate, and advanced care and medical-legal considerations: part one—diabetic foot ulcerations. Wounds. 2003;15(4):1-20.
  8. Falanga V, Brem H, Enns W, Wolcott R, Gould LJ, Ayello EA. Maintenance debridement in the treatment of difficult-to-heal chronic wounds. Recommendations of an expert panel. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2008;2:1-5.
  9. Suzuki K. Pertinent insights on effective debridement tools. Podiatry Today website. www.podiatrytoday.com/pertinent-insights-effective-debridement-tools. Published September 2011. Accessed July 3, 2013.
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